Shimano rapid rise rear derailleur

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shimano rapid rise rear derailleur

We would appreciate you reporting any issues to us rather than leaving negative feedback as we pride ourselves on offering excellent customer service and will resolve any matters accordingly. Contact us on About Us Sprockets have been trading since March and is run by riders for riders. We have built up a good reputation with our customers for both quality of product and speed of delivery. Our intention is to offer the best service and answer all your technical questions as soon as possible.

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Please give feedback for us! We aim to offer five star service Payment We accept payment via: Paypal. Cheque, postal order, debit and credit cards. With little signs of wear Weight: grams Size: Payment must be received within 4 days.Suntour built them to last. If that spring wears out, we have a spare to last for the next 40 years. Steve--I can see more of a rationale for top-normal front derailleurs than I can for low-normal rears.

Actually, I rather liked the shift of the Compe V I had, especially on hills.

Derailleur gears

If I'd known where to get a spring and how to install it, I would have kept on riding that derailleur. On the other hand, I purely and simply didn't like the shift of the rapid-rise XTR rear, or of the other rapid-rise rear derailleurs I've tried. I used to ride with a high-normal front derailleur, until it wore out and all I could get was a low-normal. I have still never got used to having to move the two levers in opposite directions 25 years later. You never got confused - levers forward for faster, levers backwards for slower - if you wanted a really big change you could even do both levers together.

shimano rapid rise rear derailleur

I've still got the old worn-out unit somewhere - maybe I'll try to refurbish it. You generally can't judge the merits of any technology on the natural friction caused by the simple fact that people will tend to cling on technologies they are already familiar with.

That said obviously newer is not always better. For example implementing dual control levers on MTBs was decisively misguided, as bikers tend to rest fingers on the brakes during technical sections and that would eventually move the lever just enough for the chain to jump cogs.

That's not to say no biker flourished on the trails riding dual control levers. But that's besides the point.

Low normal rear mechs actually addressed two inherent problems of the way rear mechs operate: 1: bump shifting: trails are hard no the vertical Gs Those have a tendency to mess with your mech as bumping your rear wheel will sometimes send your mech flying down against it's spring and shifting into a lower gear momentarily.

I've had a couple of tumbles because of that running old LX top normals in my day racing cross country. Low normals are resistant to this because to travel down during a bump they have to work against the cable witch is not possible and therefore are virtually immune to bump shifts.

But down-shifting smashes the chain against the larger gear and expects the chain to grab onto an up-ramp and climb onto it. Low normals use the spring to do the smashing, witch provides even and controlled pressure on your cogs.

This is far safer and far more efficient than you mashing the lever. Apart from those very important problems solved, there are other reasons low normal is the bomb: FAST upshifts: Coming out of the trail and mashing the release lever will get you through 9 cogs in a heartbeat! There is literally NO time needed to get thorough you entire cassette if you need to, and it happens in a controlled manner without the fear of pulling anything out of alignment, or smashing your mech against the low-stop witch many a-time has pulled the rear mech out of tune on bikes with not many rides since last replacing shift cables.

When up-shifting you use your thumb against pretty much nothing, so the feel is lighter. You will sometimes pull a little two hard and almost change two cogs instead of one and get that horrible clung of the chain falling back down a cog. That can put you off balance and cost you time. Low normal let's you leave the difficult job of being precise when you actually need it: climbing uphill. I understand it being difficult for many to get used to low normal I curse and moan and kick when I get to use my freeride rig witch has an standard top normal mech!

But once you actually get used to the low normal it's hard to go back. I never got the feeling flimsy part you mentioned.Whether you are using SRAM or Shimano, it is crucial to your trail stoke to have a properly adjusted rear derailleur on your mountain bike. A rear derailleur that is out of adjustment can cause mis-shifts and riding annoyances that not only damage equipment, but can cause injury. With all of these cables, gears and shifters, how can we be sure that our rear derailleur is properly adjusted?

Note: This guide covers every aspect of the rear derailleur from initial installation to adjustment. Use the headers as a guide to get the information you are in direct search for.

Look for Shimano Rapid Rise info at the bottom of this post…it is adjusted differently due to the nature of rapid rise. Thread the 5mm rear derailleur bolt into your derailleur hanger on your frame.

Tighten the 5mm bolt to 8 — 10 Nm 70 — 85 in. Be sure to have the alignment block in the correct position as shown so that the derailleur is situated properly on the frame.

Position your chain around the biggest ring of your crank and the largest cog on your cassette. Wrapping the chain around each and not threading through the rear derailleur, take this measurement and add two links. This is where you will be cutting your chain to length with a chain tool. After your chain is cut to the correct length, thread the chain through the rear derailleur and secure the link.

After you have installed your rear derailleur on your mountain bike, there are some initial adjustments that need to be made that apply to all rear derailleurs…regardless of brand or type.

The limit screws on your rear derailleur control how far your derailleur can move towards and away from your cassette. There are independent adjustment screws for the low level and high level adjustments. Both Shimano and SRAM require the same positioning of the limit screws, but the location of their screws are different. Low Adjustment Screw — Adjust the low limit adjustment screw so that the upper pulley is in line center to center with the largest cog on the cassette.

Manually push the derailleur out with your hand and turn the crank arms until it stops to make this adjustment. You should feel the derailleur move back and forth as you change the positioning of the limit screw. When the limit screw is in the correct position, you should not hear any clicking from the chain as it rides from the cassette to the rear derailleur.Important: We're currently closed to walk in traffic.

We're still taking and shipping orders, but you won't be able to come in and browse. Give us a call if you'd like to arrange a curb-side pickup. We're also operating with a skeleton crew, so please be ready for delays in shipping. Sold Out Out Of Stock! We will notify you when this product becomes available. In Walnut Creek, California since Availability Date:. Style Black. Add To Wishlist. That makes it easier to continue your ride until you have a chance to replace the cable.

And you pull both the front and rear friction shifters in the same direction when shifting to the high or low gear so that's a small bonus for those who appreciate logic.

Opinion de Grant: All rear derailers should be Rapid Rise. It means you move the left and right shifters the same direction for the same effect, instead of right-forward to get higher in back and left-back to get higher in front. They didn't take off because racers didn't dig them, and the average rider and conservative product managers at the big companies didn't want to risk turning off conservatives and worriers. I was one of those, so I know.

It seems like having one bike shift one way and another another would be confusing, but it's so tiny, inconsequential. You mis-shift now and then, and just correct it. Shimano knows this is better. When they gave it up they must have thought, "OK, dumb world. You have more than one bike? Try this. It's not worse, it's different.Toggle navigation.

Categories Discussions Sign in. May edited May in Workshop. I'm wondering though whether the rear derailleur, which is a C rapid-rise mechanism, will be compatible with a normal trigger shifter?

To my mind, it should be designed for 8 sprockets on the rear cassette, regardless of which way round it shifts, but am I being a bit naive? One other quick, daft question Many thanks [: ] "Get a bicycle.

Shimano XT M8100 Rear Derailleur Fitting Guide

You will not regret it, if you live. May All sounds fine to me. Rapid rise mechs work fine with normal thumb shifters - there are no specific rapid rise shifters. Also, yes, a set of deore brake levers combined with the new thumb shifters will be just the job.

shimano rapid rise rear derailleur

What do you think of rapid rise, BTW? My MTB needs new front and rear mechs after years of abuse. Have used standard rear mechs up til now but would like to give rapid rise a go. Thanks for answering the questions [: ] I'm afraid I'm hardly the person to offer an opinion on the rapid rise though. Although I bought the bike a few years ago, I barely rode it at the time and only got properly into cycling last year.

I then only rode for a few months before buying my new Specialised Tricross. I can't say I had any particular problems with it, for what it's worth, but in terms of comparing it against a "normal" rear derailleur, I unfortunately have very little experience against which to judge it.

Once fitted a rapid rise that was mistakenly sold to me. It was a nightmare as I could never remember which way to change gear. My advice, stick with a normal set up. Thanks mate, have decided to do just that. Despite stating that i'd stick with 'normal' shifting, I totally forgot to state my preference and got sold a rapid rise derailleur by LBS. I realised my mistake as soon as I bolted it to the MTB as the neutral position of the arm was under the largest sprocket, not under the smallest as I'm used to.

Looks like I'm in for some fun. Hope I get used to it. Good luck!!

Shimano XTR 970 Rapid Rise Rear Derailleur Review

Sign In or Register to comment.Derailleur gears are a variable-ratio transmission system commonly used on bicyclesconsisting of a chainmultiple sprockets of different sizes, and a mechanism to move the chain from one sprocket to another. Modern front and rear derailleurs typically consist of a moveable chain-guide that is operated remotely by a Bowden cable attached to a shifter mounted on the down tubehandlebar stemor handlebar.

When a rider operates the lever while pedalling, the change in cable tension moves the chain-guide from side to side, "derailing" the chain onto different sprockets. For more information about the choice of particular gear ratios and sprocket sizes, see Bicycle gearing. Various derailleur systems were designed and built in the late 19th century. One example is the Protean two-speed derailleur available on the Whippet safety bicycle.

However, these systems, along with the rod-operated Campagnolo Cambio Corsa [9] were eventually superseded by parallelogram derailleurs. Inthe derailleur system was introduced to the Tour de Franceallowing riders to change gears without having to remove wheels. Previously, riders would have to dismount in order to change their wheel from downhill to uphill mode.

In Campagnolo introduced the Gran Sport, a more refined version of the then already existing, yet less commercially successful, cable-operated parallelogram rear derailleurs. InSuntour invented the slant-parallelogram rear derailleur, which let the jockey pulley maintain a more constant distance from the different sized sprockets, resulting in easier shifting.

Once the patents expired, other manufacturers adopted this design, at least for their better models, [12] and the "slant parallelogram" remains the current rear derailleur pattern. However, the successful introduction and promotion of indexed shifting by Shimano in required a compatible system of shift levers, derailleur, sprockets, chainrings, chain, shift cable, and shift housing.

The major innovations since then have been the switch from friction to indexed shifting and the gradual increase in the number of gears. With friction shifting, a lever directly controls the continuously variable position of the derailleur.

shimano rapid rise rear derailleur

To shift gears, the rider first moves the lever enough for the chain to jump to the next sprocket, and then adjusts the lever a slight amount to center the chain on that sprocket. An indexed shifter has a detent or ratchet mechanism which stops the gear lever, and hence the cable and the derailleur, after moving a specific distance with each press or pull. Indexed shifters require re-calibration when cables stretch and parts get damaged or swapped.

On racing bicyclesgear rear cassettes appeared inand gear cassettes appeared in Most current mountain bicycles have either. Many modern, high-end mountain bikes have begun using entirely one chain ring drivetrains, with the industry constantly pushing the number of rear cogs up and up, as shown by SRAM's Eagle groupsets 1 by 12 and Rotor's recent 1 by 13 drive-train.

The rear derailleur serves double duty: moving the chain between rear sprockets and taking up chain slack caused by moving to a smaller sprocket at the rear or a smaller chainring by the front derailleur. In order to accomplish this second task, it is positioned in the path of the bottom, slack portion of chain. Sometimes the rear-derailleurs are re-purposed as chain tensioners for single-speed bicycles that cannot adjust chain tension by a different method.

Although variations exist, as noted below, most rear derailleurs have several components in common. They have a cage that holds two pulleys that guide the chain in an S -shaped pattern. The pulleys are known as the jockey pulley or guide pulley top and the tension pulley bottom. The cage is positioned under the desired sprocket by an arm that can swing back and forth under the sprockets.

The arm is usually implemented with a parallelogram mechanism to keep the cage properly aligned with the chain as it swings back and forth. The other end of the arm mounts to a pivot point attached to the bicycle frame. The arm pivots about this point to maintain the cage at a nearly constant distance from the different sized sprockets.

There may be one or more adjustment screws that control the amount of lateral travel allowed and the spring tension. The components may be constructed of aluminium alloysteelplasticor carbon fibre composite.Order by:. Available to:. Powered by Frooition Pro Shop Search. Click to close full size. Item Description. Normal 0 0 1 98 4 1 Gears, components and cycling accessories incorporate more than 45 years of cycling vigour built into each design; their experience and expertise make them the popular choice of the professional and amateur cyclist the world over.

If you are unsure of the total please contact us first Normal 0 0 1 60 2 1 Please notify us within 7 days of receipt and we will try to rectify the problem, replace the item or offer a full refund. We would appreciate you reporting any issues to us rather than leaving negative feedback as we pride ourselves on offering excellent customer service and will resolve any matters accordingly.

Contact us on About Us Sprockets have been trading since March and is run by riders for riders. We have built up a good reputation with our customers for both quality of product and speed of delivery. Our intention is to offer the best service and answer all your technical questions as soon as possible.

Our feedback is important to us. If you for any reason feel you have not had a positive transaction please contact us via email at info sprockets. We give positive feedback to winning bidders at the same time as receiving payment.

Please give feedback for us! We aim to offer five star service Payment We accept payment via: Paypal. Cheque, postal order, debit and credit cards. With little signs of wear Weight: grams Size: Payment must be received within 4 days. We reserve the right to file any unpaid cases through Ebay. Free shipping. Please view our calculated shipping prices to your country. We have a no-questions-asked return policy. If you are not happy with your purchase.

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